Cycling

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
Just bought an Ultegra CS-6700 11/28T 10S cassette 8-)

I now have 10 usable gears instead of 7.

The existing Sunrace cassette is on the left and I don't use 32-40 so the new cassette will make the things overall much smoother with single and double tooth steps between gears.
I won't be constantly flicking between two gears because one is too easy and the other is too hard.

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Just under $62 with local tax.
 

gethinceri

Daniil Kvyat Fan. Alfa Romeo Fan.
Contributor
Oh, I just saw your typo...it's 11-28, not 11-18. I couldn't get the mathS to work.
 

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
Oh, I just saw your typo...it's 11-28, not 11-18. I couldn't get the mathS to work.
Doh!
Good spot

Erm...you have two chainrings on the crank? How many teeth on each?
Two chainrings - 44/32.

I'll see how I get on with the new cassette before deciding whether to make any changes to the chainrings.

It's a one piece with the crank so that will mean new crank arms and a spider, as well as the chain rings.
Most likely a new front derailleur too as I don't think it will be long or tall enough to accommodate a larger chainring.
 

gethinceri

Daniil Kvyat Fan. Alfa Romeo Fan.
Contributor
yeah, your derailleur will manage a 12 tooth gap (44-32) and maybe 14 BUT, there are other things to consider...
  1. Does your current derailleur afix to the frame with a clamp around the seat tube, or directly to the seat tube (this is known as a "braze-on)?
  2. Is your bottom bracket a cartridge type or cups?
  3. What brand is the current groupset?
  4. Do you have the tools and skills to do this yourself?
  5. $64,000,000 question (I know the answer's not $64,000,000)... how much do you want to spend before you chuck the bike in the skip and buy a more appropriate one?
 

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
yeah, your derailleur will manage a 12 tooth gap (44-32) and maybe 14 BUT, there are other things to consider...

Does your current derailleur afix to the frame with a clamp around the seat tube, or directly to the seat tube (this is known as a "braze-on)?
It's a clamp so no issues there.

Is your bottom bracket a cartridge type or cups?
Cartridge (FSA).

What brand is the current groupset?
It's a mish-mash of Shimano, Sunrace, and FSA - basically built to a price point

Do you have the tools and skills to do this yourself?
Yeah, no problem. Been building bikes since my teens.
What tools and knowledge I lack I can borrow from a friend up the street who has the whole kit (ex pro racer).

$64,000,000 question (I know the answer's not $64,000,000)... how much do you want to spend before you chuck the bike in the skip and buy a more appropriate one?
My ideal would be to build a new road bike but parts availability is limited, so my current plan is to buy parts for this bike and then eventually swap them over to a road bike frame and revert this one back to a general bike.

Important point...with your new cassette I think you will need to shorten your chain if you leave the chainrings the same.
Take 3 links out.
It should be fine as the smallest cog is the same and the largest cog is smaller than the current largest cog, so it's in the same range.
However, the chain seems overly long as it is so I think I will drop a few links anyway.
 

gethinceri

Daniil Kvyat Fan. Alfa Romeo Fan.
Contributor
Good, but the chain length is determined by the overall distance that it needs to travel so, since you're reducing the cassette from 44 to 28, the length will need to be addressed.
 

Titch

Champion Elect
Premium Contributor
Before I started reading this thread I thought that a bike was just that, a bike. The more money you paid the better the bike, and that if you wanted to upgrade you sold your current bike and bought a better model. But now I see you need a degree in maths, technology and engineering.
So , do you spend more time fiddling about with your bikes or more time riding them ?
 

Bill Boddy

Professional layabout
Contributor
Blood and sand, times have changed. back in my day you had one bike fixed wheel, mainly for time trials which were basically flat, and one with gears. The gears were using two chain-rings giving gears from 57 inches to 104 inches. Changers were Campagnolo (I still have my campag spanner, I can see it from where I am sitting) front and rear.

I managed Sutton Bank at 1 in 3.8 so it handled pretty well everything that I came across.

One of my friends had a small chain-ring for when he went on holiday in the alps but the rest of us settled for a set-up like mine. Oh, I had a steel frame to add some weight.
 
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