Technical The rule book & technical innovation

Mephistopheles

Banned
Contributor
The problem with rules is that by their very nature they become almost unworkable, a rule starts out as simple and everybody knows where they stand and for a while they work and if something is wrong the ref bloke comes along with a sheet of A4 on a clip board takes a butchers and says Oi you, you cant av that get it orff now.

But then some clever dick thinks yes but if I do this it is still within the rules, he/she knows it is against the spirit of the rule but thinks sod it I know I'm cheating but I'm gonna do it anyway so when the bloke with the clip board comes around he doesn't know whether to tick the allow or disallow box he knows it is wrong but can't prove that it is wrong and so the rules have to be clarified, which makes them slightly more complicated which in turn makes them easier to circumnavigate so the rules are clarified again.

In the end the sheet of A4 on a clipboard becomes a bloody tome which hardly anyone understands and even fewer bother to read, simply because some people knew and understood the original rules but decided they weren't gonna bother playing be them...
 

soccerman17

Race Winner
I know that but why are the rules so strict? F1 really isnt at the forefront of innovation at the moment I feel like they are struggling to catch Le Mans. And Le Mans is only ahead because the rules allow for it.
 

no-FIAt-please

Champion Elect
Premium Contributor
I thought that Red Bull X2010 or whatever it was called could lap Suzuka around 20 seconds a lap faster than an F1 car, but that is with no technical or cost limitations, also the car would be extremely hard to drive.
 

f1fansp

Points Scorer
Do the FIA subject front wings to more than the static load tests?

http://www.forumula1.com/news/report-reveals-mclaren-tyre-temperature-trick/

"It might have something to do with the FIA’s recent clampdown on the MP4-27′s floor.
Reportedly after the Chinese grand prix, the governing body ruled that the British team had stepped over the line with its interpretation of the rules regarding flexibility. Scratches had been found underneath the extremes of the front wings, to which McLaren argued that the floor bending was within the allowed tolerances.
“The tolerance is there to account for manufacturing defects,” Charlie Whiting is quoted as saying, after ruling that McLaren’s system deliberately exploited those tolerances."

Suggests they looked for the effects of flexing in this case, too. Not sure if there was any issue with the load tests. Makes more sense than 2010-2011, when front wings were clearly visually bending and sparking, but the tests didn't prove this.
 

siffert_fan

Too old to watch the Asian races live.
Contributor
I know that but why are the rules so strict? F1 really isnt at the forefront of innovation at the moment I feel like they are struggling to catch Le Mans. And Le Mans is only ahead because the rules allow for it.

It seems to me that sportcars have always been more innovative than F1. Disc brakes, automatic and semi-automatic transmissions, down force enhancements (everything from wings to fan-assisted downforce), hip-mounted radiators etc, were all on sportcars first.
 
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