Suzuka at risk?

MCLS

Anti F1 fan
Valued Member
With most of Japan almost submerged due to earthquakes, tsunami's and nuclear power explosions, does anyone know if any of that has hit the track and how certain the grand prix is, because even though the grand prix itself is a long long way away, unfortunately Japan is going to be in a very bad state for quite a while and this could affect the grand prix
 

ATL11

Podium Finisher
Looking at Suzuka on the Map, it looks like it would have been further away from the destruction, also in a bay so sheltered, doubt there would have been any impact?

http://mapsof.net/suzuka/satellite

But yes be interesting if there are repercussions in regards to costs of repairing the damage, justifying a GP in October 7 months after a lot of the country was swamped, they will also have to watch for aftershocks for a few weeks, so it mey be less than 7 months.

You may on the flip side see the Japanese spirit is they want to show the world they can deal with it, therefore have the GP as a image to the World that all is back to normal in regards to the place of the Rising Sun.
 

MCLS

Anti F1 fan
Valued Member
Of course, Chad, I completely agree with you, but in a few months time when clearup starts, they might go to Suzuka and find the track submerged. It is close to the sea though. Bay or no bay. Water gets everywhere
 

Jen

Here be dragons.
Contributor
With most of Japan almost submerged due to earthquakes, tsunami's and nuclear power explosions,

I don't think you quite realise how big Japan is and it is quite a statement to say "with most of........etc".

Google it on "google maps" and you will not be worried
 

Jen

Here be dragons.
Contributor
All I meant was, in the overall scheme of things, a Grand Prix is completely unimportant.
As are most things in our God-forsaken world!

But you still have to hold out hope that one's favourite sport won't be affected by "events"
 

McZiderRed

Champion Elect
Supporter
I saw on BBC news this evening, that in the town of Rikuzentakada, Iwate, 10,000 people were missing..! :o

NHK reports that in the port of Minamisanriku, Miyagi, the authorities say that about 7,500 people were evacuated to 25 shelters after Friday's quake but they have been unable to contact the town's other 10,000 inhabitants.
Quote from BBC > http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12720219

The sheer scale of this disaster is unbelievable...
 

Pyrope

Podium Finisher
Supporter
Suzuka is substantially closer to Kobe than it is to the current epicentre, yet we still had a 1995 Japanese Grand Prix. This quake is a whole lot more serious then even that disaster, but I have no doubt that the organisers will go ahead if they can.

Fingers crossed for everyone in Japan at the moment, though. I hope the numbers turn out to be nowhere near those projected.
 

Chad Stewarthill

Champion Elect
Contributor
10,000 people are missing in one town alone, as McZiderRed reported above, nearly a quarter of a million are said to be living in temporary shelters and millions more are without water.
And yet some are worrying about whether a motor race will be able to go ahead in October.
Sorry, but I just don't get it.
 

sportsman

Sidecar racers have the biggest cojones
Contributor
10,000 people are missing in one town alone, as McZiderRed reported above, nearly a quarter of a million are said to be living in temporary shelters and millions more are without water.
And yet some are worrying about whether a motor race will be able to go ahead in October.
Sorry, but I just don't get it.

Neither do I. My concerns are with the Japanese people and news reports today that a second nuclear power station is damaged.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12724953
But the plant's operators, Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco), said radiation levels around the plant had now risen above permissible limits.
About 170,000 people have been evacuated from the area near the plant.
 

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
Not really related to Suzuka much but I was living in Istanbul, Turkey when the big one hit in 1999.

I flew out the day before though and was in the UK when it happened.
I got a call from my then girlfriend (now wife, Banu) at around 0200 telling me what had happened and she and everyone else slept outside or in their cars for the next 2 nights.

I flew back to Turkey a few days later and there were still some large aftershocks happening then.
Over 17,000 people were killed and whole towns were lost as they slipped into the sea.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1999_İzmit_earthquakehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1999_%C4%B0zmit_earthquake
 

MCLS

Anti F1 fan
Valued Member
Not really related to Suzuka much but I was living in Istanbul, Turkey when the big one hit in 1999.

I flew out the day before though and was in the UK when it happened.
I got a call from my then girlfriend (now wife, Banu) at around 0200 telling me what had happened and she and everyone else slept outside or in their cars for the next 2 nights.

I flew back to Turkey a few days later and there were still some large aftershocks happening then.
Over 17,000 people were killed and whole towns were lost as they slipped into the sea.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1999_İzmit_earthquakehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1999_%C4%B0zmit_earthquake

I remember that, Had to do a big coursework piece on that a few years ago for Geography. What it shows is that nature can easily take us down a few pegs without breaking a sweat
 

sportsman

Sidecar racers have the biggest cojones
Contributor
An earthquake and tsunami are the most terrifying experiences you can ever live through.
In 2004 I was on holiday in Khao Lak some 80 kilometres from Phucket when the tsunami hit from the earthquake in the Indian Ocean.
The noise and devestation and sheer power of the water caused unbelievable damage.Some 4000 people were killed and helping out in the clean up with cars piled on top of the few remaining buildings is a sight I will never forget.
Other parts of the clean up including recovering bodies is undescribable.Even writing this post now makes me feel the same despair as I felt then.
 

Chad Stewarthill

Champion Elect
Contributor
By the way here is a link for those who want to donate to the emergency disaster relief fund for victims of the earthquake/tsunami. If we all contribute some money towards it, it would go a long way to rebuilding Japan

http://www.globalgiving.org/projects/japan-earthquake-tsunami-relief/

Thanks for that MCLS, a fantastic idea. :thumbsup:
Edit: Here's another place that anyone who wishes to can donate:

http://www.redcross.org.uk/Donate-Now/Make-a-single-donation/Japan-Tsunami-Appeal
 
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