Grand Prix 2020 Bahrain Grand Prix Practice, Qualifying & Race Discussion

So both Championships are now decided. Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes Benz are setting new standards by which F1 teams and drivers will be measured in the coming years. Despite this, the calendar is not yet complete and we move on to that bastion of freedom and equality, Bahrain. This race was postponed from March and should have followed Australia, but like so many things COVID intervened. Now we will have a double header on the Sakhir circuit as rounds 15 and 16 are scheduled to take place on consecutive weekends. However, unlike the other double headers this year we have two different circuit layouts to look forward to.

As with previous races in Bahrain the track action will start at twilight and run in to the night around a floodlit track. Pirelli are supplying the C2, C3 and C4 tyre compounds. I suspect they may find some more grip from these at this circuit than they did in Turkey. But wait, what's this? There is rain forecast Saturday practice and qualifying! Yes, seriously - Gulf Air Bahrain Grand Prix | Realtime Weather & Forecasts

There have been occasions when having won the title Lewis Hamilton has backed off. In 2015 Nico Rosberg won the last three races of the season, with Lewis having taken the title, and used this as a springboard to win the title himself in 2016. Lewis Hamilton 2020 is, however, a different person. His teammate is nowhere near the same standard as Rosberg, and Hamilton's focus is at a different level compared to the 2015 version.

Some happy facts to help you enjoy the event. If you live in Bahrain you can go to prison for sending out a tweet criticising the race. The families of those who oppose the regime in exile are often imprisoned and tortured. Despite 70% of the population being Shiite Muslim nearly all senior positions in Government and the military are held by Sunni Muslims. Bahrain is 142 out of 180 in the global press freedom ranking with journalist who oppose the regime often jailed and tortured. Put simply, if you are a male Sunni Muslim living in Bahrain it's a great place to live. For anyone else, it's a bit shit.

Enjoy
 

FB

Not my cup of cake
Valued Member
I'm a bit confused by some of the headlines surrounding Grosjean accident. Ones such as this - Grosjean's escape leaves F1 with soul-searching to do

Driving a car is dangerous. Driving an F1 car at very high speed is very dangerous. It is impossible to eliminate all risk from F1, unless you stop the sport entirely. There will be on-going improvements but is the reaction a bit over the top? Have we moved from an era where injury and death of drivers was "part of the sport" to an era where no injury and even the slightest chance of death is completely unacceptable?
 

Hamberg

FOTA VIP, I've got the avatar to prove it :)
Contributor
I'm a bit confused by some of the headlines surrounding Grosjean accident. Ones such as this - Grosjean's escape leaves F1 with soul-searching to do

Driving a car is dangerous. Driving an F1 car at very high speed is very dangerous. It is impossible to eliminate all risk from F1, unless you stop the sport entirely. There will be on-going improvements but is the reaction a bit over the top? Have we moved from an era where injury and death of drivers was "part of the sport" to an era where no injury and even the slightest chance of death is completely unacceptable?
I think in this day and age we have to aim for the latter don’t we? That doesn’t mean to say death won’t happen but we have to strive to avoid it and be absolutely horrified/expect changes when inevitably it does happen as you can’t account for every eventuality.
 

The Artist.....

Champion Elect
F1Brits_90 - deaths definitely are not acceptable, but the easiest way of preventing deaths completely is to stop the sport (which is what Switzerland did in 1955).

If you wish to run F1, then there will always be risks of “freak” accidents. What can be done is to make sure that these are as survivable as possible. Had the HANS and the HALO been in place in 1994, both Senna and Ratzenberger would probably have walked away from their accidents in 1994.

The last two deaths in F1 shouldn’t have happened. Both Jules Bianchi and Maria de Villotta died because of negligence. There should have been prosecutions relating to both of those accidents.
 

Dartman

Podium Finisher
There is a responsibility to oneself both Bianchi and Villota incidents had a high degree of personal liability regarding the conditions and speed with Bianchi and speed in the paddock with Villotta.
 

The Artist.....

Champion Elect
This reads as being at best a brush with the legality of the rules, at worst a rule breach... Once upon a time, teams could replace as many tyres as they liked, but more recently, tyres have had to be changed "as a set" - as a set of tyres goes together.

The only exception is when one is damaged, and can be replaced by one "of a similar age" - I suppose Mercedes could argue that the tyre that they didn't change was much older, but,... it's not great.
 

F1Brits_90

Champion Elect
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