Pirelli tyres.Pedro De la Rosa.

sportsman

Sidecar racers have the biggest cojones
Contributor
Interesting comments from Pedro.

http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/89988
De la Rosa, who is now a reserve driver at McLaren, believes that the excitement delivered by the tyres may be a headache for drivers and teams – but it good news for those watching the sport.
"I think it will be great for the fans," he said. "It is difficult to predict exactly how many stops we will have. You can say roughly that it will be around three, and that is fantastic.
"I remember last year that on a Thursday you already knew, no matter what the tyre compound was or which circuit it was, whether it was going to be a one-stop strategy with the window opening between lap 12 or 18. That would then be the end of the story.
"Now you have a lot of play with, and it will be more interesting for the fans. In F1 we talk about degradation, about linear degradation and non-linear degradation, but really we should think about the fans.
"Let's go to Australia, let's do the first few races and let's see what the fans think of the whole situation. And then let the teams and Pirelli decide what is next."
 

snowy

Champion Elect
Pedro is right about it being unpredictable, unfortunately I can predict with a certain degree of certainty that it will only be unpredictable for the first one or two races.

I can also predict the unfortunate by-product of tyre degradation and more pitstops will be more time watching cars sitting about doing nothing on TV. Whilst all the action takes place on track the producer doesn't have to keep flipping cameras and keeping up with the cars that are actually moving if he has the car in the pits to focus his and our attention on. It is surprising how many producers take this soft option, I guess it is giving them a breather. For me it is like disconnecting my life support from the virtual lung machine and connecting it to a video of an airport lounge. They might as well be showing me adverts.
 

sportsman

Sidecar racers have the biggest cojones
Contributor
Pirelli compound colours


Each tyre will carry its own colouring on the Pirelli and PZero logos affixed to the sidewall.
The six colours are as follows:
Wet - orange
Intermediate - light blue
Supersoft - red
Soft – yellow
Medium – white
Hard – silver
Pirelli colours.jpg
 

Speshal

World Champion
Valued Member
white and silver really? :givemestrength:

"He's on the mediums -no the hards - no the mediums"

I suppose if they've only got hard and soft or medium and soft to choose from it would be OK
 

Josephiah

Podium Finisher
Nice, just spotted that on the beeb. Of course, there'll be no confusing the white and silver as the medium and hard will never be available at the same race.

EDIT: whoops, think we posted at the same moment - my "of course" wasn't meant to sound so condescending!
 

Andrea_Moda_Rules

Podium Finisher
Oh jeez couldn't we of stuck of just having the softer tyre marked at gP weekends, Not too fussed, but im part man part idiot (im not 100% sure about the man bit). Theres going to be omre then once when im thinking 'Why the heck is he on wet tyres in a dry race?' before somebody has to explain to me that Red is Hard not wets.

Would suck if your colour blind too. Red and Orange, Silver and white. doh!
 
J

johnnoble1990

Guest
Pirelli compound colours


Each tyre will carry its own colouring on the Pirelli and PZero logos affixed to the sidewall.
The six colours are as follows:
Wet - orange
Intermediate - light blue
Supersoft - red
Soft – yellow
Medium – white
Hard – silver
View attachment 1145

That is brilliant, except for the white and Silver which look the same at rest, so imagine they will look the same when in motion.
 
J

johnnoble1990

Guest
Have they got rid of the rule where the top 10 start on the same tyres as quali. This should add further to the intrigue of strategy, if i am remembering correctly.
 

sportsman

Sidecar racers have the biggest cojones
Contributor
Have they got rid of the rule where the top 10 start on the same tyres as quali. This should add further to the intrigue of strategy, if i am remembering correctly.

No.That rule remains.
http://argent.fia.com/web/fia-publi...LE/1-2011 SPORTING REGULATIONS 10-12-2010.pdf
25.4 Use of tyres :
Tyres will only be deemed to have been used once the car’s timing transponder has shown that it has left
the pit lane.
a) Three sets of dry-weather tyres will be allocated by the FIA technical delegate to each nominated
driver for use during P1 and P2, two of “prime” specification and one of “option” specification. These
are the only dry-weather tyres which may be used during these sessions.
One set of “prime” specification must be returned to the tyre supplier before the start of P2 and one
further set of “prime” specification and one set of “option” specification before the start of P3.
If an additional driver is used (see Article 19.1(b) he must use the tyres allocated to the nominated
driver he replaced.
b) Eight further sets of dry-weather tyres will be allocated by the FIA technical delegate to each
nominated driver, four of each specification, for use during the remainder of the Event. However, one
set of each specification must be returned to the tyre supplier before the start of the qualifying
practice session and may not be used during the remainder of the Event.
c) Prior to the start of the qualifying practice session intermediate and wet-weather tyres may only be
used after the track has been declared wet by the race director, following which intermediate, wet or
dry-weather tyres may be used for the remainder of the session.
d) At the start of the race each car which took part in Q3 must be fitted with the tyres with which the
driver set his grid time. This will only be necessary if dry-weather tyres were used to set the grid time
and if dry-weather are used at the start of the race.
 

Josephiah

Podium Finisher
The silver and white shouldn't be a problem as the hard and medium won't be available at the same race due to the FIA's 'must be a gap of at least two compounds between the prime and option tyres available at a race' rule. So we'll see red and white together, or yellow/silver or red/silver. Not white and silver together. I think!

Jo
 

ATL11

Podium Finisher
Still white & silver, it's going to be difficult to see if it's Medium or Hard compound, or do we know before the race weekend what tyre is selected, who does this Pirelli?
 

sportsman

Sidecar racers have the biggest cojones
Contributor
Yes.Pirelli have already stated the compounds for these races.
So Austrialia will be silver and yellow.
Pirelli has nominated the hard and soft dry tyre compounds for the first four rounds of the 2011 Formula One World Championship: Bahrain, Australia, Malaysia and China.

The hard tyre will be the prime tyre, whereas the soft will be the option. This decision has been made in accordance with the track characteristics in the Middle and Far East, which offer high grip and a wide variety of speeds and corners, as well as ambient and track temperatures that are likely to be high.
 

KekeTheKing

Banned
Supporter
Apparently, Jarno Trulli doesn't feel that same way as Pedro. He thinks that following too many pit stops will be confusing to the viewer. Don't worry Jarno, we'll always know where to find you!

http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/90101

"After just five laps the tyres lose a good part of their efficiency. The most balanced cars can reach seven laps, but after that it's a vertical drop. A driver can do 14 laps to finish his run, but with no performance.

"This is why we have complained: it's not true, as I've read in some places, that we asked for tyres that degrade so quickly. We've never asked for any such thing, also because for a driver tyre consistency is a fundamental element.

"It's what allows you to evaluate all the other set-up variables. If the tyres are inconsistent you never really understand what makes your performance better or worse.

"The tyres' high degradation will also cause great confusion in the race, with at least three pitstops for each car. That's an average of 72 pitstops per race: a hardly manageable situation. The Federation has taken notice, and so has Pirelli.

"No one wants to leave the race in the hands of such a random variable. Pitstops are random elements that are too difficult to manage, therefore I hope the situation may improve on Sunday already."

Random variables a bad thing? Has there ever been a race where random variables did not make for exciting viewing. Sure,it might mean that the fastest car doesn't win, but that's the kind of stuff that makes for classic GP's.

 

Pyrope

Podium Finisher
Supporter
Random variables a bad thing? Has there ever been a race where random variables did not make for exciting viewing. Sure,it might mean that the fastest car doesn't win, but that's the kind of stuff that makes for classic GP's.

Very true. As there will be a fairly high number of stops each race the stop windows will be fairly small, only 2-3 laps in most cases. This means that we ought to see a flurry of stops followed by 10-15 laps of everyone being back in position, then another flurry of stops, followed by another period of stability. I think it might actually be easier for a viewer to follow than the one or two stop scenario, where you are sometimes not really sure whether a driver is going for a long stint in a two stop race, or has lightly fuelled for the first stint of a one-stopper.
 

teabagyokel

#dejavu
Valued Member
No-one, said, Jarno, that you, the drivers, asked for degrading tyres. No, its just that everyone else with a casual interest in Formula One did!

Of course, this would disrupt the JT race strategy:
  1. Qualify high
  2. Block everyone else until your sole pitstop on lap 41
"No one wants to leave the race in the hands of such a random variable. Pitstops are random elements that are too difficult to manage, therefore I hope the situation may improve on Sunday already."

Who are they too difficult to manage for? Several teams seem to do it seamlessly; Jenson Button has scarcely put a foot wrong strategy-wise in the last two years even if his pace hasn't always been there.

The only thing that can be inferred is that 1Malaysia are running scared of new regulations, maybe to explain why they're not quite the midfield runners Mike Gascoyne has repeatedly said they would be. However, surely without randomness of some variety, 1Malaysia are unlikely to pick up points anyway.

I think the problem here is that if they do pick up points, it is likely to be Kovalainen plundering them.
 

Grizzly

Bear
Contributor
He thinks that following too many pit stops will be confusing to the viewer. Don't worry Jarno, we'll always know where to find you!

I read that earlier, well some of it. The article confused my little brain too much:rolleyes:. No really, after two lines, reading that pit stops will confuse me, I was a little insulted and switched off.

It may be true in my case, but the truth hurts!
 
J

johnnoble1990

Guest
Random variables a bad thing? Has there ever been a race where random variables did not make for exciting viewing. Sure,it might mean that the fastest car doesn't win, but that's the kind of stuff that makes for classic GP's.


Random variables is what makes sport exciting. It's one of the reasons wet racing is so excited. It is not only that overtaking is easier, it is that it becomes unpredictable. Whether it is strategy, driver spinning, being on the wrong tyres. Some of the most exciting races i can remember were because of random variables. Lewis winning the 2008 championship on the final corner was completely random. Didn't make it any less special, it made it more so.
 
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