Grand Prix 2011 German Grand Prix Practice, Qualifying & Race Discussion

siffert_fan

Too old to watch the Asian races live.
Contributor
To me,the main point of the weekend was that the FIA's continual search for ways to slow down the Red Bulls relative to the other teams is bearing fruit. While some may applaud this, as it gives their favourites a chance to win, personally, I think that this effort by the FIA lends an aura of artificiality to F1, to the point that it is approaching NASCAR in that respect.
 

Incubus

Champion Elect
Alonso gave Hamilton a lift in 2009 at Suzuke after the latter saw his vintage car give up the ghost halfway through the drivers' parade. Does that count?
 

RevMaxPower

Banned
To me,the main point of the weekend was that the FIA's continual search for ways to slow down the Red Bulls relative to the other teams is bearing fruit. While some may applaud this, as it gives their favourites a chance to win, personally, I think that this effort by the FIA lends an aura of artificiality to F1, to the point that it is approaching NASCAR in that respect.
I love the way we all see things differently according to which Team or Driver/Drivers we follow and admire! :)

One mans' meat and all that... It's what makes this Forum so interesting. 8-)

Hamilton and Furry Nando for me, by the way... Two great drives yesterday.
 

Sarinaide

Banned
Well Mark and Fernando are friends and keen cyclists so it is not really that surprising that Mark pulled over.....plus I don't think Mark Webber is that kind of character anyways.
 

Quintessentially

-
Contributor
To me,the main point of the weekend was that the FIA's continual search for ways to slow down the Red Bulls relative to the other teams is bearing fruit. While some may applaud this, as it gives their favourites a chance to win, personally, I think that this effort by the FIA lends an aura of artificiality to F1, to the point that it is approaching NASCAR in that respect.
It is an approach littered throughout the history of motorsport, especially when one team designs a car with such a significant performance advantage. It happened as recently as Renault with the mass damper. I am certain Redbull's advantage would've been completely eroded a long time ago under Max. At the same time credit must go to McLaren and Ferrari for their effort in closing what looked like an insurmountable performance deficit at some point and to Hamilton and Alonso for yesterday proving once again that when it comes to out and out racing they are the two best drivers in the field. Formula One doesn’t create these types of drivers anymore and the modern day F1driver to far too risk averse. In the absence of these two it would’ve almost certainly been a Redbull procession. Vettel's fast lap was just over 2tenths shy of Hamilton's but critically was made 12laps before Hamilton. This underlined the sheer pace in the Redbull despite being in turbulent air.
 

Slyboogy

World Champion
Contributor
Barrichello didn't have KERS on his car in this race while Maldonado did, might explain the difference.
 

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff member
A little late, but here's the tyre analysis from the race.


It's interesting how many drivers set fastest lap on the prime tyre.
Obviously the slower speed of the tyre is being countered by the reduction in fuel as the race draws to an end.
 

teabagyokel

#dejavu
Valued Member
One of the things that didn't seem to be mentioned was that yes, the prime tyre is 2 seconds slower than new softs, but its not 2 seconds slower than worn softs!
 
Obviously the slower speed of the tyre is being countered by the reduction in fuel as the race draws to an end.
Yes that's a big factor.

Also, wouldn't track evolution help a little bit given that rain overnight basically made the circuit 'green' and as the race went on grip increased?

Also...Did track temperature during the race rise too? Perhaps it was cooler at the start of the race and slightly warmer an hour and change later?
 

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff member
It's going to be a combination of all of those factors.

Makes you wonder if any of the front runners could have pitted slightly earlier than they did.
I'll see if I can find the lap time chart I created.

Edit: Found it.

 

Chad Stewarthill

Champion Elect
Contributor
One of the things that didn't seem to be mentioned was that yes, the prime tyre is 2 seconds slower than new softs, but its not 2 seconds slower than worn softs!
Yes, especially once the track had rubbered in as the race progressed.

I think MB did sort of mention it but not till quite late on, once Petrov started setting faster lap times on his new primes than he had on his last set of worn options. But you'd think they might have foreseen something like that a bit sooner.

Btw, that's a great chart, thanks Brogan. :thumbsup:
 

Chad Stewarthill

Champion Elect
Contributor
Those two charts illustrate quite nicely how Hamilton was able to keep his lead over Alonso at the end. Most drivers took 3 or 4 laps to set PB's after changing to the primes but Hamilton, looking at the lap times chart, was on the pace almost immediately, denying Fernando the chance of getting past by staying out longer on his options.
 
It's going to be a combination of all of those factors. Makes you wonder if any of the front runners could have pitted slightly earlier than they did.
Perhaps the race was so tight that the Pit Walls were scared to make a move until they got a mid field runner to give them an indication on a Prime-Option Delta, lest they look like idiots?

Sometimes teams would rather wait to get a guinea pig number (Petrov in this case) than risk looking stupid.

There's only two ways to look: Hero or Stupid. Given mentality, people would rather not look stupid.
 
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