Next generation HD video

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
The London Olympics has just showcased the world's first live broadcast of the latest viewing technology - super hi vision, with pictures 16 times as sharp as HDTV and multi-channel surround-sound.

Super hi vision, developed by the Japanese broadcaster NHK, provides ultra high definition pictures - 16 times as sharp as high definition images, which themselves are four times as clear as standard TV pictures.

The sound is much better too. HD surround-sound uses 5.1 channels and is very impressive. Super hi vision uses 22.2.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-19049341

Although we won't be able to benefit from it at the moment due to domestic panels only having a maximum of 1920x1080 pixles, in the future it's going to be interesting to see what the difference is.

Of course, the ultimate limiting factor is the human eye.
Even now with standard HD, to take full advantage of it on a 1 metre panel, you have to sit as close as 1.5 metres.

Even so, I look forward to what appears within the next 10 years.

Such a shame that the best plasma manufacturer (Pioneer) is no longer in the business.
 

FB

Not my cup of cake
Valued Member
I wish they would make some better programs instead of worrying out the picture and sound quality!

Seriously though, you realise how bad SD is after you've watched HD for a while. The sooner all channels are broadcast only in HD the better. CRT anyone?
 

FB

Not my cup of cake
Valued Member
My attitude with technology has been to buy into it and wait at least 5 years before upgrading. I was an early adopter in digital photography and the image res was 640x480 but I loved that camera.
 

cider_and_toast

Exulted Lord High Moderator of the Apex
Staff Member
Premium Contributor
The real trick is to buy the right thing at the right time. Companies have to keep the tech moving forward otherwise no one would bother getting anything new. The trouble is that all to often the size of the upgrade isn't enough to justify the purchase. I don't ever see a time for example, when 3D tv's will take off. I think we'll see holographic TV before that. It's all about the difference between the want and the need.
 

jez101

Bookies drive nice cars because of people like me
Contributor
The real problem is the bandwidth needed to distribute pictures at 25+ fps at this resolution.

I wish they would make some better programs instead of worrying out the picture and sound quality!

Seriously though, you realise how bad SD is after you've watched HD for a while. The sooner all channels are broadcast only in HD the better. CRT anyone?

The biggest benefit of still having SD is that you can still believe the drama programmes that you see. On HD you can see that the actors are acting. On SD, the lack of detail is filled in by your brain making it all a lot more believable!

I know this because I still have a 36 inch CRT which I bought for about a grand when HDs were just coming through for £5,000. Having spent that much and with the "old" thing still in perfect working order (and way too big to move anywhere else), it just didn't make sense to upgrade
 

sushifiesta

Champion Elect
Contributor
The biggest benefit of still having SD is that you can still believe the drama programmes that you see. On HD you can see that the actors are acting. On SD, the lack of detail is filled in by your brain making it all a lot more believable!

Hmmm, I bet people said the same about Black & White TVs when Colour TVs started coming out...

HD is better in every way, both the picture and sound, and I completely disagree that that does anything but add to the viewing experience. For example, there can be a lot more significant detail in the background and I find colours are also a lot more vivid, which means things like Pixar animations look amazing. I think the increase in sound quality (mainly with Blu-ray films) is just as noticeable as the increase in picture quality as well, but that's rarely mentioned.

Even now with standard HD, to take full advantage of it on a 1 metre panel, you have to sit as close as 1.5 metres.

That doesn't mean you don't get ANY advantage though.

Such a shame that the best plasma manufacturer (Pioneer) is no longer in the business.

I think I'm right in saying that Panasonic bought the Pioneer technology. We have a Panasonic plasma at home and it's excellent. LED/OLED screens will probably slowly take over as the technology with the best picture quality though.

As for super hi vision, that's something to look forward to in the future!
 

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
That doesn't mean you don't get ANY advantage though.
If you sit too far back, you will not see the benefit of the extra resolution due to the inability of the human eye to resolve/perceive it.
Similarly, there is a limit as to how close you can sit.

So my point was more about the difference between different HD resolutions, not the difference between HD and SD.

Yes, Panasonic did buy the Pioneer technology but they never fully implemented it.
Nothing will ever beat the Pioneer Kuro range.
 

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
A new high-resolution television format has been approved by the UN's communication standards setting agency.

Broadcasts in 8K will offer a resolution of 7,680 by 4,320 pixels - roughly the equivalent of a 32 megapixel photo.

That is 16 times as sharp as current HD TVs offering about 2MP resolutions.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-19370582
 

Mephistopheles

Banned
Contributor
This all sounds like the old washing powder adds to me, at first your whites were just white then a new powder could get them whiter and after that they were whiter than white it even got to a point where you get your whites so white they they looked blue..

Not having the best eyesight given to man I find it difficult to see any benefit from HDTV (That hasn't stopped me from buying one though.) and being blind in one eye 3D TV is just bloody pointless.

When I was at uni they were doing research on a TV where you could have three or four people in the same room watching the same telly but each of them could be watching a different channel, this was achieved by the viewer seeing the screen from a slightly different angle (Some cameras can do a similar thing where you can put it into a mode so that you can hold the camera above your head in a crowd and still see the screen.) each viewer had to wear a transmitter so that the TV knew at which angle to project the picture, obviously each person would have to wear headphones for the sound, Imagine that a family sat in the same room all watching different channels and no one communicating as a family, sounds unbelievably dire to me...

And what if dad is watching something on the adult channel and mum is watching corrie and suddenly there is a crossover of pictures there could be all sorts going on in the Rovers....
 

Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
With the correct set up and feed, I have no doubt the benefits of 8K will be as apparent as HD is over SD.

I doubt many households will be able to benefit from it though, due to space and other practical limitations, such as screen size.
 

sushifiesta

Champion Elect
Contributor
I suspect that a lot of people's impressions of HD are skewed by TVs and/or DVD players that use upscaling technology. The difference between standard definition pictures on conventional technology versus high definition is huge, but the difference between upscaled standard definition pictures and genuine high definition pictures can be more subtle.
 
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