Grand Prix 2020 Tuscan Grand Prix Practice, Qualifying & Race Discussion

After an unexpectedly bizarre and topsy-turvy race at Monza, the teams and drivers have little time to catch their breath ahead of round nine. While the trucks will be returning back to bases across Europe in between, I choose to imagine them in convoy taking the three-hour journey south on the Autostrada A1, passing close to Maranello, on their way to Mugello, nestling in the stunning Tuscan hills north of Florence.

Mugello will be the first new venue to host an F1 race in Western Europe for 12 years, but the area's motorsport history stretches back to 1914, from when it hosted a race on a 38-mile course of public roads in the manner of the later Mille Miglia and Targa Florio events. A tragic accident in practice for the 1970 race forced organisers to look at local sites for a permanent circuit, and the Autodromo Internazionale del Mugello opened in 1974.

Ferrari have owned the circuit since 1988, and used it extensively for testing in the unrestricted era. It therefore represents a fitting venue for Ferrari's 1,000th Formula One World Championship Grand Prix. Those with sharp memories will recall Formula One celebrating the category's 1,000 milestone at Shanghai last season - the mismatch of 27 being mainly explained by Il Commendatore's willingness to occasionally miss races in the 1950s and 60s due to industrial action in Italy, or, more often, if the starting money on offer wasn't up to his expectations. This happened much more often when his cars were uncompetitive.

Contemporary motorsport fans are most likely to know Mugello as the long-standing home of the Italian round of MotoGP, where the legendary Valentino Rossi thrilled the home fans with seven consecutive victories from 2002-08. On four wheels, the track has been a regular fixture on domestic GT and touring car calendars, but international events have tended to be few and far between in recent years.



The layout should be more accommodating for the Ferraris than Spa or Monza, featuring only one long straight and a preponderance of fast, constant-radius curves, ensuring that a high downforce setup is likely to be adopted. After the first turn, the most plausible overtaking spot despite a relatively short braking area, the first half of the lap features a series of fast esses, leading to the double-apex right at Arrabbiata, which is sure to provide dramatic viewing in contemporary F1 cars. Comparisons to Catalunya and Sepang could be made, and with clear skies forecast and temperatures around 30C this weekend, tyre preservation and strategy may well be to the forefront in the race.


What should we expect from the Grand Prix? While the teams will have little or no relevant data to work with, the widespread use of simulation tools means that we shouldn't expect too many surprises in the competitive order, nor any particular home advantage for Ferrari. Mercedes will be looking to reassert themselves after setup problems and a pitstop balls-up at Monza, though the track characteristics and potential importance of tyre wear could play into the hands of Max Verstappen. The race will be a good test of Racing Point's performance level, who seem to have dropped back into - maybe behind - the top of the midfield battle in recent races. Williams' new owners will be taking the wheel for the first time and understanding exactly what they've bought, while although Romain Grosjean won at Mugello in European F3 back in 2007, a Gasly-like burn from the stern for the Haas driver is probably asking too much.
 

F1Brits_90

Race Winner
well where do you start with all this. you wait 2 odd years to see a red flag standing start after the rule is brought in & we get 4 in 2 weeks

Verstappen start was weird. absolutely demon then it was like he had no battery power Gasly literally hero to zero. proving that 7 days is a very long time in F1 last week. he got all the plaudits & alot of discussion wether he should be recalled to Red bull. & then he did that stupid move, small part of me says racing incident but for the majority is what was gasly thinking when you have car either side of you that was always going to end in disaster & then he ruined the golden boys race

i thought bottas incident was dangerous, because you just have to see the on board to see how terrifying it was. in heat i thought penalty as i had baku F2 2016 or 17 vibes when matushita had similar issues because he kept a constant speed & alot of weaving as was worried about slipstream. but then that concertina the grid up & back of the grid sees green light & goes for it like you would expect because they are coiled springs. but maybe it was all a perfect storm & everyone had some fault that resulted in that. until the 2nd red flag, i thought Bottas was unlucky today. he will feel he shouldve won today. but he just had bad luck ocon in qualifying. normally you take the lead then that is job almost done. but all that sympathy went during the final 15 laps. just poor again. its becoming a trend, lewis will at some point go & im going to start trying now. & off down the track he goes

as i said a week is along time in f1, albon i hope thats the break through he needs because that was a fantatsic race, especially the move he pulled off to get that podium & the 1st thai to finish on the podium since 1949 italian race. he's gone from demote him to maybe staying for 2021. how quick things change. that 2nd red flag really did stuff alot of people, riccardio feel for him he was by far the driver of the day until stroll accident comfortable in 3rd & also george russell im gutted for the guy, he has about as much racing luck as i have betting luck. he had 2 pts in the bag but that bad restart really cost him

So the top 3 from last week are all out. It was good for them while it lasted.

funnily enough i was joking during the race, saying i bet stroll terrified as the last week podium gasly out 1st lap. sainz out safety car restart. then 25 laps later it seem mercedes kerb worries were realised at racing point at worse possible place on circuit average speed 175mph
 

P1

Podium Finisher
Can't be sure but I would say Toto's folded arms and scrunched brow suggest he's not overwhelmingly keen on Hamilton's fashion choice.
I read that he is now being investigated for the FIA for breaking the rules on not using the podium for political statements.

Personally I respect him for it. If I was at the top of my career I would want to do things like that. It is the greatest act of leadership I have seen from a Formula One driver in my viewing time (since the early 90s).

And I also agree with what his T-shirt said. It shouldn’t be controversial or political. It is part of the freedoms of our civilization that unarmed people who are not even wanted by the police should not be shot by the police while inside their own home. It is well established that people should be innocent until proven guilty. And most people believe that until someone is proven guilty they should not be executed by the state.
 
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FB

Not my cup of cake
Valued Member
My wife told me some parts of social media recated badly to Hamilton's T-shirt, which probably says more about them than it does him. Personally I think it's up to him if he wants to get involved, although I'm sure there are various rules about political statements. I suspect he can afford any fine and even if they ban him form a race he'll probably still win the title, and there would be uproar.

F1 does not have an exactly stellar history when it comes to dealing with dodgy political regimes, going back to the races in South Africa during Apartheid and Argentina when under a military dictatorship, through to the current races in China and the Middle East. Perhaps this might make those who run the sport take a step back and look at what they do from a political perspective but the mighty dollar rules at the end of the day.
 

F1Brits_90

Race Winner
im ok with this because as we know politics & sport is not a new thing its go hand in hand. anyone who believes different is incredibly naive this has been going for almost a century. Jesse Owens the most famous in the "hitler Olympics" & then 5 summer Olympics in a row 1968 - 1984. that were all affected by political issues. even the last 2 & tokyo which didnt happen with Russian Bans. & when there is injustice, as become more fact not a debate espically after contrasting behaviour from the police, for him to be silent & just accept this. he would feel thats him being complicit
 

FB

Not my cup of cake
Valued Member
Back on topic this is worth a read, especially what Michael Masi has to say about the restart behind the safety car. I particularly enjoyed this comment "there had been a similar situation in a Formula 3 race over the weekend and those drivers "navigated it quite well""

 

F1Brits_90

Race Winner
i didnt know FB that but i assumed that he wouldve been a hero considering it was his olympics but i guess, it would be up to read this in the newspaper as it wouldnt be broadcast in america until 1960. so im shocked but not surprised. but thats politics & sport. i think in world cups & olympics it would be harder to find events that werent political than what were

as i said in in my report. that i think its that nobody was to blame because everyone had some fault into that crash, Bottas for holding them so long because he was terrified that lewis was going to get through & that was that. i still think he been chatted too & was under pressure. as there was a marked change in demeanour. he alot more punchy. the officials for putting the green flag/light out there, that shouldnt be used until the leader has bolted. & the people in the middle of the gird for accelerating & braking. weirdly the people at the back who were retired where the ones that arent at fault because stood no chance because they cant see, all they know is people are accelerating & green light. so go
 
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cider_and_toast

Exulted Lord High Moderator of the Apex
Staff Member
Premium Contributor
I think times have changed since Dear Old Bernie exited stage left. I think all walks of life are much more socially conscious these days.
 

Il_leone

Champion Elect
i didnt know FB that but i assumed that he wouldve been a hero considering it was his olympics but i guess, it would be up to read this in the newspaper as it wouldnt be broadcast in america until 1960. so im shocked but not surprised. but thats politics & sport. i think in world cups & olympics it would be harder to find events that werent political than what were

as i said in in my report. that i think its that nobody was to blame because everyone had some fault into that crash, Bottas for holding them so long because he was terrified that lewis was going to get through & that was that. i still think he been chatted too & was under pressure. as there was a marked change in demeanour. he alot more punchy. the officials for putting the green flag/light out there, that shouldnt be used until the leader has bolted. & the people in the middle of the gird for accelerating &

braking. weirdly the people at the back who were retired where the ones that arent at fault because stood no chance because they cant see, all they know is people are accelerating & green light. so go

F1Brits_90 Nope Afro Americans were very much treated as 2nd class citizens back then despite Owen's upsetting Hitler's Olympics and theory of the perfect human specimen

Cassius Clay aka Muhammad Ali was treated even worse in the 60s despite winning Olympic Gold. His hometown didn't acknowledge his achievements because of his skin. In his disgust he threw his medal into the river
 

Il_leone

Champion Elect
Incidentally what Hamilton wore on his top is no different to Naomi Osaka in Tennis bearing names of black people being shot by police on her face mask

Sport should not be turning a blind eye and thank goodness we ain't doing Austin this year or Trump might try Nd steal the limelight by getting a photo with Hamilton
 

P1

Podium Finisher
My wife told me some parts of social media recated badly to Hamilton's T-shirt, which probably says more about them than it does him. Personally I think it's up to him if he wants to get involved, although I'm sure there are various rules about political statements. I suspect he can afford any fine and even if they ban him form a race he'll probably still win the title, and there would be uproar.

F1 does not have an exactly stellar history when it comes to dealing with dodgy political regimes, going back to the races in South Africa during Apartheid and Argentina when under a military dictatorship, through to the current races in China and the Middle East. Perhaps this might make those who run the sport take a step back and look at what they do from a political perspective but the mighty dollar rules at the end of the day.
Thanks for sharing the Jesse Owens story, I wasn't aware of that, and it really brings to life the hypocrisy of that generation.

It's interesting that the F1 website only has photos of Hamilton without the t-shirt. Mercedes AMGF1 was more courageous on social media, although they also had images with his corporate overalls to keep the sponsors happy which makes sense.
 

P1

Podium Finisher
Looks like it is true that he is being investigated. I doubt they will penalize him.

Some quotes from the article:
The controversy surrounding the legalities of the police officers' actions has prompted some to suggest that Hamilton's T-shirt was a political opinion, something which his own Mercedes team hit back at on social media on Monday.

"We're not bringing politics into F1, these are human rights issues that we are trying to highlight and raise awareness of. There's a big difference," said the team in response to posts criticising Hamilton.

In a regular note that is sent to drivers regarding their pre-race anti-racism ceremony, F1 race director Michael Masi makes clear: "The FIA supports any form of individual expression in accordance with the fundamental principles of its statutes."

The FIA statutes state that the governing body is neutral in everything it does.

Its documents state: "The FIA shall refrain from manifesting discrimination on account of race, skin colour, gender, sexual orientation, ethnic or social origin, language, religion, philosophical or political opinion, family situation or disability in the course of its activities and from taking any action in this respect."

There is also a reference in the International Sporting Code which states that teams may not use political advertising on their cars, but there is no specific mention to drivers.

"Competitors taking part in International Competitions are not allowed to affix to their automobiles advertising that is political or religious in nature or that is prejudicial to the interests of the FIA," states article 10.6.2 of the International Sporting Code.

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F1Brits_90

Race Winner
FIA are in a tough spot, because this is a big issue & does need highlighting for them reasons & i know that its an issue that not just him feels extremely strongly about this. i did think ooh not sure about this on podium. because ive not seen this before. i do feel on the 1 hand its a shame about Hamilton because he breaking records every weekend & is on course to break records we thought were untouchable. but we arent talking about

i know FIFA have the same issue. to fact they even banned poppies on England shirts. because they were political symbols
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Brogan

🦶 Leg end
Staff Member
I suspect the FIA will need to rewrite them to cover drivers protesting human rights and abuse, as there's nothing in there about that currently.
 
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