Politics The EU

Bill Boddy

Professional layabout
Premium Contributor
But if the electors knew that the turnout had to be a minimum of 80% there was no point in voting if you wanted No. Maybe 10% of the electors did just that, we will never know.
 

Dartman

Points Scorer
The advantage of the 50% rule is the 'don't cares' are counted for the status quo which makes those voting for or wanting change a minority, however if there is an overwhelming reason to change then the vote will be over 50% even if it's 51% of the electorate on a 55% turnout. Brexit would have lost out on the referendum in '16, Cameron was no Maggie and this showed him up as not fit to lead due to lack of forward thinking.
 

Izumi

Points Scorer
The advantage of the 50% rule is the 'don't cares' are counted for the status quo which makes those voting for or wanting change a minority, however if there is an overwhelming reason to change then the vote will be over 50% even if it's 51% of the electorate on a 55% turnout. Brexit would have lost out on the referendum in '16, Cameron was no Maggie and this showed him up as not fit to lead due to lack of forward thinking.
Argument could be perhaps also made, that 51:49 vote has its downside in making far reaching and impactful decisions such as leaving EU is. I do not see many positives in angering about half of voting electorate when they don't get what they wanted. I think calling referendum was not the wisest decision available, however once they went ahead, it should have had some rules, such as 3/4 of voters must decide on what to do, or something to that effect. Scanning political scene in UK today leaves an outsider like me perplexed and wondering who is really running country these days, just as who will calm waters the morning after Brexit is done and over? This might take a generation or two before life will take some shape and form of normality; tension and general stress is IMO no good for anyone on the inside, or outside.
 
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Angel

Happy to help.
Contributor
In some countries (like Australia for example) you're obliged to vote. If that was the case it might be more fair as everyone would have to give a view. Saying that, I don't believe you should be forced to vote either.
 

Titch

Champion Elect
Premium Contributor
I like to vote, especially when the entire system is crap, it’s all we can do to protest. I don’t understand people who blindly vote the way they always have, or just don’t vote. Nothing will ever change if we all do that.
 

Angel

Happy to help.
Contributor
I always vote, I always think if you don't at least try to get the right result you don't have right to complain about what you do get.

Given my health issues and the fact they moved our polling station away from where it used to be, making it much harder for me to get there. I have a postal vote now, it's so much easier.
 
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RasputinLives

Not dead
Contributor
Back in my student days the parties used to send buses up to campus to round up as many students as they could to take them down to the polling station. Then they'd try and talk you into voting for them on the ride down!
 

Titch

Champion Elect
Premium Contributor
We have postal votes as well Angel . It means that even with my husband in hospital he can make his voice heard. It’s a very civilised system.
 

Izumi

Points Scorer
I thought burden of Brexit was enough of headache for Europe, but now we are learning Mr. Johnson, who is under (criminal or civil?) Investigation is also running for premiership. Wonderful. Mr. Farage in Brussels, and Mr. Johnson in No.10. Circle is now completed.
 

cider_and_toast

Exulted Lord High Moderator of the Apex
Staff member
Premium Contributor
What the hell..... Maybot's plan to convince Parliament to back her Brexit deal is to say she will step down if she loses the vote.

One of the poorest Prime Ministers of all time tries to get MPs to vote for an unpopular deal by telling everyone she will resign if she loses

Bye then.
 

vintly

Mostly bacon
Premium Contributor
I can't see Johnson getting in, I think he's pissed too many people off and will be seen as too much of a handful to get enough votes.
 

Izumi

Points Scorer
PM trying for fourth time the same plate, adding some new incentives along way. That's a juicy new steak on offer and hard to refuse by pack of wolves behind her. It reminds me of a movie once I watched, when a person locked inside padded room pounding on the door repeatedly, screaming, let me out...

Yeah, right. That's what is going to happen (not).
 
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cider_and_toast

Exulted Lord High Moderator of the Apex
Staff member
Premium Contributor
I think he finally went too far with the comment about historic sexual abuse cases and his party will see it as too much of a risk to have him as PM for the next GE
The Tories are in not quite as bad a state as Major's government found itself in by 1994. With three years until the next general election whoever comes in now has to face the same uphill struggle to turn around the appalling opinion poll ratings. We all know how badly it went for Major in 97.

As long as the economy remains reasonably stable the Tory recovery may be possible but couple the current Omnishambles with a weakening economy, likely due to Brexit, and they've got no chance.
 

F1Brits_90

Race Winner
In some countries (like Australia for example) you're obliged to vote. If that was the case it might be more fair as everyone would have to give a view. Saying that, I don't believe you should be forced to vote either.
I always vote, because I always think that their numerous countries that cant vote or votes are rumoured to be "rigged" the old joke that the Zimbabwe or North korean elections were so unfair, ant & dec came 2nd. its not right to pass up that luxury, even if it means voting in the local elections for whoever lives closest

I can't see Johnson getting in, I think he's pissed too many people off and will be seen as too much of a handful to get enough votes.
or considering how the tories are more bothered about internal squabbing, do you think they will give boris Johnson a chance. knowing that he will fail & would shut him up once & for all
 

Angel

Happy to help.
Contributor
The Tories are in not quite as bad a state as Major's government found itself in by 1994. With three years until the next general election whoever comes in now has to face the same uphill struggle to turn around the appalling opinion poll ratings. We all know how badly it went for Major in 97.

As long as the economy remains reasonably stable the Tory recovery may be possible but couple the current Omnishambles with a weakening economy, likely due to Brexit, and they've got no chance.

To be honest as long as Labour keep Jeremy Corbyn as leader the Tories are on safe(ish) ground I reckon. An awful lot of people don't like him or trust him. Saying that the Tories are doing their level best to tear their own party apart right now.

Trouble is, who else does it leave? There isn't really a viable third option as far as I can see.

I always vote, because I always think that their numerous countries that cant vote or votes are rumoured to be "rigged" the old joke that the Zimbabwe or North korean elections were so unfair, ant & dec came 2nd. its not right to pass up that luxury, even if it means voting in the local elections for whoever lives closest l
Agreed F1Brits_90 I always vote, always have and always will. That way I can comment on who is in power. I voted in the local elections, I've already posted my vote in for the EU elections. It's important to have your voice heard, even if ultimately no one really seems to listen.
 
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