Politics The Politics thread

Discussion in 'Gravel Trap' started by Jen, Jul 14, 2011.

  1. Brogan

    Brogan Leg end Staff Member

    Featured Threads:
    5
    What a shame none of those now profiting from books never had the balls to say any of this at the time, or do anything about it.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14778802

    It was obvious to everyone that things weren't working well at all when Brown was at the helm.
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to remove all adverts.
  3. teabagyokel

    teabagyokel #dejavu Valued Member

    Featured Threads:
    38
    I would say it was more of a case of SNAFU.
     
    Fenderman likes this.
  4. Jen

    Jen Here be dragons. Contributor

    The only saving grace from Mr Darling (does he have a daughter called Wendy?), is that he refused to be 'reshuffled' - or so we are lead to believe.

    This is exactly why anyone elected to Parliament should have served for at least twenty years in a money-making industry (preferably not banking) - but that is also the catch 22 - we don't seem to have anything except 'service industries' left and the old and wise know better than to try and buck the current culture that says 'youth' is good.
     
    Fenderman likes this.
  5. Fenderman

    Fenderman Rooters Reporter

    Featured Threads:
    1
    Fantasy F1 Profile:
    FF1 Profile
    MP's selected for cabinet positions should indeed have the appropriate skill set and experience for the particular post. Money makers and bankers may not necessarily be the right folk's for social policy, environmental positions, etc. but like any organisation, parliament needs it's specialists and generalists. Those selected for the various posts should have all of the appropriate skills and qualities for the jobs they have to do. One has to wonder just how many of our representatives are not the best fit for the posts they hold.
     
    jenov2003 likes this.
  6. TN23

    TN23 Rookie

    Our government needs to be made up of people who know and understand the society we live in- therefore they would surely be motivated to change things for the many that have so little. The problem is that the government (and indeed the wider parliament) is often just one upper middle class to super rich set of private school and Oxbridge alumni. Those things are mot bad in themselves, but the class it breeds to shape our society is most undesirable to those who live and have lived through greater hardship than the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Vast Oxfordshire Estate.
     
    dave and Fenderman like this.
  7. TN23

    TN23 Rookie

    ...by the way, I'm not saying that having great institutions to aspire to, such as Oxford or Cambridge, is a bad thing. But their intake (the brightest and best are generally kids that have had their parents pay for 'specialist' private school teaching- these kids are tailored to fit the Oxbridge requirements), is made up quite substantially of the upper and upper middle classes. State schools do not charge fees (and are given pitiful sums to work with by the government), so of course, these kids (even if they are of a similar ability) stand to lose out to the private schoolers.

    Basically, I think that state school attendance should be compulsory for all. I suspect there will be a 'How would you fund this?' question coming up...
     
    dave and Galahad like this.
  8. Jen

    Jen Here be dragons. Contributor

    I would disagree with this quite strongly - I have little but am still better off than some, yet am deemed in some quarters to be middle class because I had a good education - not quite Oxbridge though.

    As Fender says, we need a mix of folk - the important thing is that they have a degree of experience in the world and are not just failed luvvies which is how I have seen a lot of our leaders over the last few years.
     
    Fenderman likes this.
  9. Jen

    Jen Here be dragons. Contributor

    Nonsense again - both my children teach in the state system and it ain't easy.

    To be quite honest, I would urge any parent who can afford private education, to take it up.

    BTW, it is actually quite hard to get into Oxbridge now - quotas and 'rounded individuals' are normal now, so you no longer get the brightest let in - so if you have the intellect of Einstein but don't participate in any sport or have hobbies then you don't stand a chance.
     
    gethinceri likes this.
  10. TN23

    TN23 Rookie

    Well, I don't think that much of the current cluster do understand (you don't have to have lived through that, you just have to understand) what its like to find the cupboards empty, three days to the next pitiful wage (that's if you can find work at all) and 60p in your wallet.

    I think that it would be fine if the government (regardless of class) understood what it should be doing in society- but they seem to only understand the willings of top-end capitalism and the preservation of a super-class at the top of the pile. That's the problem that I have, and particularly private schooling seems to reinforce this.
     
    Fenderman likes this.
  11. TN23

    TN23 Rookie

    ...Sorry, I didn't add that everyone should be state educated if the government can afford it
     
  12. Jen

    Jen Here be dragons. Contributor

    Hopefully, life gives you understanding and knowledge - even patience if you are very lucky. Work and education attunes you to the common ethos, which you either take on board or not depending on your political stance/upbringing.

    Personally, I have always had great regard for the free thinkers of this world even if I don't agree with them, as long as they can justify their opinion rationally.
     
  13. Brogan

    Brogan Leg end Staff Member

    Featured Threads:
    5
    About time, but I'm guessing nothing will change :rolleyes:

    The UK government is to announce it is setting up a commission to look into the so-called West Lothian question.

    There has been a long-running debate about whether Scottish, and Northern Irish and Welsh, MPs should be allowed to vote on legislation that affects only England.

    English MPs are not able to vote on many matters which are now devolved to other UK parliaments.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-14831619
     
    Fenderman and mjo like this.
  14. Brogan

    Brogan Leg end Staff Member

    Featured Threads:
    5
    Sigh... http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-14907909

    When will these people learn that strikes never solve anything, and besides, these pension reforms are well overdue in this day and age.

    Perhaps they think the government can just magic up some money especially for them?
     
  15. FB

    FB Not my cup of cake Valued Member

    Featured Threads:
    54
    Fantasy F1 Profile:
    FF1 Profile
    Fantasy F1 Team-mate:
    FF1 Team-mate
    Fantasy F1 Rival:
    FF1 Rival
    Well there's plenty of cash sloshing about to bomb Libya. Oh, and part of the reason for reducing the number of MP's with the boundary changes (apart from making it easier for the Conservatives to win a majority) is to give us elected police commissioners - yet more politicians we don't need simply to suit one political groups prejudices.
     
    Fenderman likes this.
  16. Brogan

    Brogan Leg end Staff Member

    Featured Threads:
    5
    Boundary changes and gerrymandering happens in every parliament.

    I seem to recall Labour being particularly adept at it.
     
    Fenderman likes this.
  17. FB

    FB Not my cup of cake Valued Member

    Featured Threads:
    54
    Fantasy F1 Profile:
    FF1 Profile
    Fantasy F1 Team-mate:
    FF1 Team-mate
    Fantasy F1 Rival:
    FF1 Rival
    Indeed so, in this instance the Lib Dems are right in the thick of it as well as they stupidly agreed to Commons reform for their pathetic attempt to get AV through. Interesting that both Ed Balls (what a silly name) and George Osbourne lose their constituencies.
     
    Fenderman likes this.
  18. Fenderman

    Fenderman Rooters Reporter

    Featured Threads:
    1
    Fantasy F1 Profile:
    FF1 Profile
    Heh, heh, a new take on going "Balls out".LOL

    Edit: Does this mean that if he gets nominated for a different seat it will be "Balls up for parliament" again ...:snigger:
     
    jenov2003, Andrea_Moda_Rules and FB like this.
  19. Galahad

    Galahad Not a Moderator Valued Member

    Featured Threads:
    6
    The reforms that have already been agreed and implemented mean that the public sector pensions burden will decrease over the coming years - further reform is not required.

    Unfortunately, unlike the bankers, the union leaders can't have a cosy fireside chat with Gideon Osbourne over higher rate tax breaks and deferred regulatory reform, so they have to express their views in a more direct manner.
     
    FB and Fenderman like this.
  20. gethinceri

    gethinceri Daniil Kvyat Fan. Alfa Romeo Fan. Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    2
    Why do people insist on calling him Gideon when he calls himself George? What is the point that you are trying to make in doing so?
     
  21. Galahad

    Galahad Not a Moderator Valued Member

    Featured Threads:
    6
    I could call myself Barbara if I wanted to, it wouldn't change my name.
     
    Fenderman likes this.

Share This

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use it, you are agreeing to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice