The pedantic, speeling and grammer thread's

Discussion in 'Gravel Trap' started by gethinceri, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. Mezzer

    Mezzer A fine chap if ever there was one. Contributor

    "Its/it's" is confusing as it's (;)) one of the few examples where the apostrophe-s does not denote possession but rather the removal of the "i" from "it is".
     
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  3. ExtremeNinja

    ExtremeNinja Karting amateur Contributor

    It's "Jen's"
     
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  4. gethinceri

    gethinceri Daniil Kvyat Fan. Alfa Romeo Fan. Contributor

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    I ****ing give up.
     
  5. ExtremeNinja

    ExtremeNinja Karting amateur Contributor

    Mezzer

    I know that. I never get that one wrong. It's the possession one I always get wrong and don't understand. I'd also like to know why we use the apostrophe to denote possession and why we only apply it to names...or do we?. Baffles me! Josh has had a good go but it's not totally conclusive. Any more help, anybody?
     
  6. Mephistopheles

    Mephistopheles Banned Contributor

    Its = belonging to,,, It's = it is the possession of is simples....
     
  7. ExtremeNinja

    ExtremeNinja Karting amateur Contributor

    I know that. It is always simple to say what something is. I'm looking for the why it is. I know the why to the latter but not to the former.
     
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  8. Mephistopheles

    Mephistopheles Banned Contributor

    "i.e." stands for "id est" which is Latin for "that is"

    "e.g." stands for "exempli gratia" which is Latin for "for example"

    So no excuses for the misuse of them now is there...:)
     
  9. Mephistopheles

    Mephistopheles Banned Contributor

    So what you are asking is why bother with commas at all? a lot of people say we shouldn't but I think they make sense...
     
  10. ExtremeNinja

    ExtremeNinja Karting amateur Contributor

    Eh? Where and when did commas come into the conversation and when did I ask that?

    I'll repeat my original question about apostrophes and the use of them to denote possession. Why do I ask the way to Peter's house and then ask what colour its front door is?

    Both of the emboldened words are possessive.
     
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  11. gethinceri

    gethinceri Daniil Kvyat Fan. Alfa Romeo Fan. Contributor

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    Because you've never been there?
     
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  12. Mephistopheles

    Mephistopheles Banned Contributor

    I meant apostrophes dammit....>:(
     
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  13. ExtremeNinja

    ExtremeNinja Karting amateur Contributor

    Still none the wiser. It seems we are all at a loss on that one at the moment.

    I'm Peter and I'm at his house at the moment. I also have a dual personality disorder. ;)


    Me: Doctor Doctor, I think I have multiple personalities.

    Dr.: Don't worry son, I think your OK.

    Me: Phew but what about him?
     
  14. Fenderman

    Fenderman Rooters Reporter

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    Dunno. It's almost as bad as my tendency to mis-spell acronyms like: WDC when I mean WCC. Terrible.:)
     
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  15. Mezzer

    Mezzer A fine chap if ever there was one. Contributor

    :p

    ExtremeNinja Its nouns as well as names, right? E.g. The dog's tail. Of course then there's the tricky ones where a name ends in 's' so there is just an apostrophe, e.g. Jesus' sandals were copied by many a teacher/The lady's problem was nothing compared to all the ladies' problems added together.

    Ah the joys of our mother tongue. I should get a pat on the back, living in the US I face a daily assault on the English language. :)
     
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  16. ExtremeNinja

    ExtremeNinja Karting amateur Contributor

    Yep. That's right? So why, I ask, not "it's" instead of "its" when used in the following example:

    "What was its reason for not having an apostrophe?"

    I'll give you a pat on the back for good grammar, but no lollipop for knowing the reasoning behind the grammatical rule, yet.
     
  17. Mephistopheles

    Mephistopheles Banned Contributor

    Mezzer Gratia of course, my mistake but to cover it you could have added [sic] to the quote..
     
  18. ExtremeNinja

    ExtremeNinja Karting amateur Contributor

    Ooh. Now tell me what that means. Is it an excusal of a mistake by deflection to the origin of the quote?

    I've wanted to know this for so long but have never looked it up.
     
  19. Mephistopheles

    Mephistopheles Banned Contributor

    "thus"; in full: sic Latin erat scriptum, "thus was it written"

    [sic] means you are quoting something or someone exactly and any mistakes in it are not your own.

    Well that is the simplest way of saying it I think.
     
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  20. mjo

    mjo Procrastinating Contributor

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    Is it St. James' Park or St. James's Park?
     
  21. ExtremeNinja

    ExtremeNinja Karting amateur Contributor

    The former, although I think it can be written both ways. It is certainly more elegant the first way.
     

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