1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use it, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Ask The Apex

Discussion in 'Formula One Discussion' started by Galahad, Aug 4, 2010.

  1. FB

    FB Not my cup of cake Valued Member

    Featured Threads:
    41
    Fantasy F1 Profile:
    FF1 Profile
    Fantasy F1 Team-mate:
    FF1 Team-mate
    Fantasy F1 Rival:
    FF1 Rival
    With all the questions about FRIC suspensions and other bizarre ideas which F1 has spent millions on have the active suspensions which were used prior to 1993 in F1 ever found a use on road cars?
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to remove all adverts.
  3. TR

    TR Rookie

    Active suspensions were used in road cars long before F1, most famously in the Citroen DS. Looking at the grab bag list provided on Active suspension - Wikipedia active suspensions seem to have commonly applied in luxury road cars since the late eighties.
     
    FB likes this.
  4. cider_and_toast

    cider_and_toast Everything in moderation Staff Member Premium Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    20
    Lotus were testing F1's first active suspension when Colin Chapman passed away in December 1982.

    Most of F1's major supposed major innovations were actually in use on road cars before they made their way into F1.
     
  5. TR

    TR Rookie

    Does anybody know if any tracks use permeable asphalt as a top layer? Driving from Germany to the Netherlands (where most highways are paved with a type of permeable asphalt known as ZOAB) in the rain recently reminded me how much ZOAB improves driving conditions in the rain (essentially eliminating all spray and standing water). It seems to me that applying ZOAB to race tracks would completely eliminate the need to stop or neutralize races in all but the heaviest down pours. It would almost certainly eliminate the current need of running the field with full wets behind the safety car to remove excess water from the track.
     
  6. Wombcat

    Wombcat Podium Finisher

    I think it's unlikely. ZOAB doesn't withstand friction very well, which is the reason they only apply it on highways. In the turns on a racing circuit there is a lot of friction, which would lead to quick detoriating of the asphalt. I think it's very likely it wouldn't even last a racing weekend.
     
    TR likes this.
  7. RasputinLives

    RasputinLives He's the master of going faster Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    40
    Could an F1 driver benefit from performance enhancing drugs? If so which are best suited?
     
  8. gethinceri

    gethinceri Bearded. Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    1
    Any of the muscle growth ones I should imagine.
     
  9. RasputinLives

    RasputinLives He's the master of going faster Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    40
    EPO?
     
    Wombcat likes this.
  10. Wombcat

    Wombcat Podium Finisher

    That one. And cera.
     
  11. Incubus

    Incubus Champion Elect

    Featured Threads:
    3
    Actually I think speed and amphetamine would definitely bring some sort of performance-enhancing advantage over a race-distance. Increased awareness, sharpened-up reflexes, super-fast reaction times and long-lasting effects.

    On the other hand they might make one overly confident and aggressive in a wheel-to-wheel battle.

    I wonder how many drivers in the olden-days, pre-sixties and that, indulged in amphetimines to sharpen their reflexes at a time when amphetamines weren't even considered a drug at all?...
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2017
  12. RasputinLives

    RasputinLives He's the master of going faster Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    40
    My follow up question is would the use of such drugs by an F1 driver be as frowned upon and considered dishonourable as it is in a cyclist or athlete? Unlike those sports motor racing Isn't a physical one person verses physical one person game. The car is built by a team. Would a driver on EPO just be considered the equivalent of a flexi wing? Technically not within the rules but teams WI get away with if they can and only stop FIA wag their finger.

    Other than Frank Montangy driving Formula E after a night snorting coke I can't think of any other drugs bust in Motorsport. Is that because it's not checked for?
     
  13. FB

    FB Not my cup of cake Valued Member

    Featured Threads:
    41
    Fantasy F1 Profile:
    FF1 Profile
    Fantasy F1 Team-mate:
    FF1 Team-mate
    Fantasy F1 Rival:
    FF1 Rival
    F1 drivers are drugs tested, albeit not as often as many other sports. The physical side of driving is quite severe and if you look at most drivers nowadays they look almost emaciated as the teams force them to be lighter and lighter so they can rearrange the weight in the car.

    Modern F1 drivers are also super fit in comparison to the those in the 60's, 70's and 80's. I remember reading articles about Schumacher having various blood tests during his physical training programme to make sure his oxygen, blood sugar levels etc. were optimum. He raised the bar in that respect.

    I suppose many drivers could use drugs to help with recovery after injury and training. I'm sure that things like beta blockers could help in the race to maximise concentration and control heart rate.

    Anthony West, a Moto 2 rider, was found to have taken a prohibited decongestant in 2012. The drug found, Methylhexanamine, is also a stimulant. This is the most recent person I can find sanctioned in motor sport.

    The FIA have an anti-doping programme: Anti-doping. However, it doesn't appear they carry out many test: Jenson Button: F1 drivers are no longer drug-tested.

    This is an interesting article, albeit prompted by Mark Rent-a- Gob Webber sounding off: FIA drugs tests a joke: Webber
     
  14. The Artist.....

    The Artist..... Champion Elect

    Featured Threads:
    1
    I can see the possibility that drugs like Modafinil might be of significant benefit to F1 drivers; Modafinil increases concentration, and decreases the likelihood of distraction - it is particularly used by ADHD children, and (more illegally) by students who want to boost their revision for examinations.
     
  15. RasputinLives

    RasputinLives He's the master of going faster Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    40
    FB interesting that should come from Webber who at one point was friends and trained with Lance Armstrong. I wonder if it gave him an insight into drugs in sport and he didn't like it. He kinda of dances round the subject in his autobiography but would be fascinated to know whether he was suspicious of Armstrong before everything came out.

    Anyways. Just an interesting one. I wonder if it's a done thing in F1 or whether it really is a drug free sport.
     
  16. Rutherford

    Rutherford Rookie

    The use of EPO would not be highly beneficial to the demands of Motorsport racing. ESAs are drugs that are used in endurance sports such as cycling, running, skiing etc.. The hormone stimulates the production of red blood cells, these cells contain a protein called hemoglobin which carries oxygen, therefore, the increase of red blood cells improves the oxygn delivery to the muscle and enhances the athletes ability to perform in endurance sports.
     
    TR likes this.
  17. RasputinLives

    RasputinLives He's the master of going faster Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    40
    Is driving an F1 car at high gees for 2 hours not the same type of endurance?
     
  18. gethinceri

    gethinceri Bearded. Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    1
    No.
     
    TR and RasputinLives like this.
  19. TR

    TR Rookie

    I don't think the requirements on muscle development in F1 are such that they cannot be achieved and maintained by pretty much anybody following a suitably tailored workout regime. Resorting to muscle growth enhancers seems like any extremely lazy and dangerous way of achieving the desired level of fitness. Especially since it is not a matter of more muscle = better performance, beyond a certain optimum more muscle is probably detrimental. I don't see any driver with a half bit of sense going that route.

    Drugs enhance concentration and/or reaction time are more likely.

    I also would not be surprised by a racing driver testing positive on more mundane substances on the banned list. (Caffeine (Red Bull!), cocaine, etc.)
     
  20. gethinceri

    gethinceri Bearded. Contributor

    Featured Threads:
    1
    Which banned substance list is caffeine on nowadays?
     
  21. TR

    TR Rookie

    I am not sure. I know it used to be on various.
     

Share This