Grand Prix 2018 Belgian Grand Prix Practice, Qualifying & Race Discussion

Discussion in 'Formula One Discussion' started by cider_and_toast, Aug 18, 2018.

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  1. F1Brits_90

    F1Brits_90 Race Winner

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    For me like cider_and_toast its indisputable. From the slow motion. im not it wouldve hit him flush with the tyre but you can see it wouldve have made contact at some point as tyre marks & the footage proves. When you think what happened when a 800g spring did to massa. What a 10kg tyre couldve

    This is coming from a person that was hugely against halo. I saw a quote that said i would rather discuss "that saved his career" than "that cost him his career"
     
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  3. RasputinLives

    RasputinLives Happy to be me again Contributor

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    vintly in a catogry that is defined as open wheel racing then the wheels are always going to be exposed. That's the whole point. The halo was brought in for the exact reason you described. Unless rather than the halo you'd like F1 to turn it's cars into DTM cars? Wouldn't need the halo then I guess.
     
  4. The Artist.....

    The Artist..... Champion Elect

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    For me, one incident sold me on the need for the halo (or some form of cockpit protection) - namely Henry Surtees' accident.


    I do wonder, if the halo had been available in IndyCar, would drivers like Dan Wheldon still be with us as well?
     
    Angel and rufus_mcdufus like this.
  5. Clay

    Clay Learner

    No. The accident crushed the car's airbox which is stronger than the HALO.

    On Leclerc's incident:

    It doesn't look like Alonso's tyre would have hit Leclerc. The damage to the HALO is only cosmetic, the actual structure is covered by a layer of carbon fibre.
     
  6. Angel

    Angel Rookie Supporter

    The fact is having a helmet on as a racing driver only offers so much protection, we all know that. The halo does offer protection from the head being damaged by parts flying up towards the driver or as in the case on Sunday, a car going over the top of them and clouting them with a wheel or whatever on the way over.

    There are always going to be risks in motorsport no matter what you do, everyone knows that, you can't eliminate them all. For me the halo (even though I never liked the look of it) has proved itself worthy of being fitted and it didn't take long to do so. We don't want to go back to the bad old days when racing drivers died on a semi regular basis, at least I don't anyway.

    With the speed the cars go and the impacts when they either come together, throw out a broken part or hit something solid you have to have a safe amount of protection. The human body isn't as tough as the cars and can't be repaired as easily either.
     
  7. vintly

    vintly Mostly bacon Premium Contributor

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    Putting a block in the way of the back wheels wouldn't turn F1 cars into DTM cars, neither would it necessarily mean F1 would have to forfeit the 'open wheel' description, which is after all just a phrase to describe, not define, F1.
     
  8. RasputinLives

    RasputinLives Happy to be me again Contributor

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    I respectively disagree. Open wheel for me is open wheel. The Halo is effective as far as I'm concerned.
     
  9. vintly

    vintly Mostly bacon Premium Contributor

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    Fair enough. I expect there will be an occasion where the halo is shown to have categorically stopped serious injury or worse, proving its effectivity. It's also effective at making the cars look odd and obscuring the view of the driver. Plus they look silly when exiting the car – this is clearly much more important than driver safety.
     
  10. Ruslan

    Ruslan Test Driver

    Yea, I have always leaned towards full fendered, full body F1 cars. They did have a couple in 1954 or 1955, but I gather they have been outlawed since. It does increase their straight line speed. I do find that most people immediately object to covering the wheels. Not sure why.
     
  11. Ruslan

    Ruslan Test Driver

    Agreed.
     
    gethinceri likes this.
  12. cousinDave

    cousinDave Points Scorer

    Might it have saved Senna?
     
  13. gethinceri

    gethinceri "suck my balls honey" Contributor

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    No, he wasn't killed by an impact from outside the vehicle.
     
    The Artist..... likes this.
  14. The Artist.....

    The Artist..... Champion Elect

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    gethinceri

    Senna’s death was due to the wheel and suspension bouncing up and poercing his helmet.

    It is possible that the halo would have deflected this.
     
    gethinceri likes this.
  15. Galahad

    Galahad Not a Moderator Valued Member

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    Respectfully, it's still ugly. And, it could still impair a driver's ability to scramble clear when his car flips over. So it depends quite a bit on what the naysayers were naysaying. I don't think the debate is over - because otherwise we will get enclosed wheels, roll cages...who knows what, and F1 won't be F1 any more.
     

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